Can Sitting or Standing Hurt A Young Baby’s Bones?


March 6, 2018 by: Roy Benaroch, MD Article Tags:

Q: “Is it true that putting infants (2-4 months old) in a sitting position before they are able to sit unassisted can damage their spine? I’ve read posts by people about this but don’t know how much truth there is. Assuming the child can hold his head up enough to be able to ‘sit’ on someone’s lap or on a sitting device for relatively short periods of time, is there a limit to how long this should occur before it becomes dangerous?”

A: Little babies love to master new things. And they have fun doing it, too – their eyes sparkle when they learn to stand in your lap, or when they sit up with a little help to see the whole world. When they’re lying down on the floor or their bed they can only see the ceiling. Where’s the fun in that?

Their little minds and bodies are made to grow and develop and try new things. Spending time on their tummies helps babies develop muscles in the front of their chests, and helps them practice the coordination to lift their heads and look around. Time spent sitting up exercises different muscles, too. And bones themselves grow and develop based on the stresses and loads that they experience – so, yes, standing up is a good thing to help babies grow stronger and more confident of their skills.

A few caveats – keep a little common sense in mind. Those gizmos that help babies sit up are fine, but not if you put them on top of a table or counter. They can still topple out of them, so never use them on a raised surface. Also, a baby has to be able to hold his or her head up unsupported to stay in an upright position.

Is there a limit to how long babies should try these new positions? Sure – let the babies tell you. If it starts to hurt, they’ll get upset, and that’s when you’ll pick them up or move them or try a new activity. If bones are being “damaged” by the stress of a new activity, they’ll hurt, and you’ll know it. That’s why people feel pain when they should stop doing something. Babies are very good at telling you when something hurts.

They’re also very good at telling you when they’re happy. So help your baby learn new things and try new ways of standing, sitting, and getting around. Have fun!

Roy Benaroch

Roy Benaroch, MD

Roy Benaroch, MD, FAAP is an Associate Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics with Emory University. He has produced several courses exploring medical cases for laymen in his "Medical School for Everyone" lectures, available from The Great Courses, and has also written books for parents and chapters in medical textbooks. He is also on the Board of Directors of The Children's Care Network, one of the largest clinically integrated pediatric care networks in the country. Dr. Benaroch practices general pediatrics near Atlanta, GA.